Keynote Speakers

Professor Kamilla Elliott, Lancaster University

Kamilla Elliott, Lancaster University

Professor Kamilla Elliott, Lancaster University

Professor Kamilla Elliott’s research interests lie in literature’s relationship with other media, especially the visual arts and film. She is currently working on sequels to her two monographs: Rethinking the Adaptation/Theorization Debate follows on from Rethinking the Novel/Film Debate (Cambridge, 2003); Victorian Literature and the Rise of Picture Identification, 1836-1918 continues the research published in Portraiture and British Gothic Fiction: The Rise of Picture Identification, 1764-1835 (Johns Hopkins, 2012). Her essay, ‘Cinematic Dickens and Uncinematic Words’ (2003) was reprinted in Dickens Adapted (2012); her chapter, ‘Face Value in A Tale of Two Cities’, in Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities, and the French Revolution (2009) is being expanded as part of a section on the passport in her monograph, Victorian Literature and the Rise of Picture Identification, 1836-1918; her recent research includes forays into Dickens and picture identification in ‘Picture-identifying authorship’ (Celebrity Studies 7.4, 2016) and into mobile phone ad-apptations of Dickens in ‘Ad-app-ting the Canon,’ (Adapting the Canon, eds. Ann Lewis and Silke Arnold-de Simine, Legenda Press, Jan. 2017).

Professor Juliet John, Royal Holloway

Professor Juliet John, Royal Holloway

Professor Juliet John is the Hildred Carlile Chair of English Literature and Director of the Centre for Victorian Studies at Royal Holloway. She has published widely on Victorian literature and culture. Much of her work focuses on the relationship between Dickens’s work and the popular cultural contexts of the Victorian and post-Victorian periods: her book Dickens and Mass Culture (Oxford University, 2010) shows how Dickens envisioned and brought about his own cultural pervasiveness and examines Dickens’s post-Victorian afterlives in film, heritage, and the now extinct visitor attraction, ‘Dickens World’. Her latest book is The Oxford Handbook of Victorian Literary Culture (published in June). She has recently been working on contemporary mass culture: she has an essay in press on ‘Melodrama and the Contemporary Mass Media’, for The Cambridge Companion to Melodrama, edited by Carolyn Williams, and another on ‘Crowdsourced Dickens’ for The Oxford Handbook of Charles Dickens, edited by John Jordan, Bob Patten and Cathy Waters. She is the Editor-in-Chief of Oxford Bibliographies: Victorian Literature.

The full programme is available here.